This is the fifth part in a series of blogs looking at the process of a physiotherapy assessment and treatment plan. If you have missed the 4 earlier blogs, then here are the links:

A Different Perspective On Your Physiotherapy Assessment

 The Subjective Physiotherapy Assessment

The Subjective Physiotherapy Assessment – Part 2

The Physical Assessment

Your prescription is the final part of the physiotherapy assessment process. After we've got a connection. We have learned who your authentic self is. We’ve gone through the four keys analysis, to assess your immune system and general health. We have worked out what’s going on with you in terms of food, movement, stress, lifestyle and the way that you use your mind. And we’ve looked and listened to your physical being, all the sensations that are going on your physical being. How sensitive you are. How much warmth, your circulation. The hesitancy when we move part of the body, the link with your eyes and your brain. The tone in that part of the body. And we've worked out what's going on, at that moment, to the best of our knowledge.

Only then do we decide on a tailor-made prescription for you, which can be a combination of many things. These may need to be in my clinic, or there may be a lot of things you can do at home as you don't really need us to be there for you, apart from just encouraging you along the way. It may also involve physical treatments, via just laying on hands, massage, that connection, dry needling, acupuncture, shockwave, manipulation, exercise advice. You name it, there's a myriad of physical hands-on treatments that we do.

We will write a prescription that's tailor-made just for you. It will be based on that moment in time, your immune system, your mind, your lifestyle and your available time. It will then progress to help your body get to the best you can be for your age, with whatever problem that you have. That is what tailor-made means. It means being listened to. And it means prescribing that medicine, be it in terms of a pharmaceutical drug, be it in terms of herbal medicine, be in terms in what we do, which is physically treating you and listening to you and looking at you holistically.

That's what we do.

If you are in pain right now and you feel confident we can help, then why not call. Erica, Jean and Charlotte will be happy to help.

Call 01889 881488 Now

p.s. Don’t try to book online at this time as that is only suitable for existing clients already being treated for an existing problem.

The Physical Assessment

 

In my three previous blogs on physiotherapy assessment

A Different Perspective On Your Physiotherapy Assessment

 The Subjective Physiotherapy Assessment

 The Subjective Physiotherapy Assessment - Part 2

 

I discussed concepts and steps which for most will not have been considered and most will have assumed that the physical assessment was the first step.

That is the mistake that so many make, missing out on the vital steps of creating the right environment to build connection and trust and gaining a deeper understanding of your important beliefs. Make that mistake and you are destined to gain so much less.

So the physical part of the assessment. What do we do? Well, in a private room we may ask you to take off some of your clothes, so you might want to be wearing clothes you're comfortable in and can take off quickly. If you're too shy to take off your clothes, just say it, it's not a problem.

Many of the assessments we make at my clinic are not common in the UK or anywhere else in the world. I am fortunate to have studied and qualified at the highest level in specific pain relief techniques and as a result I have learnt and ingrained advanced assessment techniques in myself and the rest of my team.

Then we'll be looking structurally at your skin. What does it look like? How healthy it is? What are the hairs like? Are there hairs missing? Does that mean the nerves are not working properly in that area? What's the temperature of the skin? Is it sweaty? Is it dry? How does the limb move? Does it move normally? If not, it will tell us is it’s likely to be arthritis in the joint that's blocking it. Or is it likely to be a tendon? Or a muscle or ligament? Or is it the nerves? Are they transmitting messages normally?

Or is it the brain? Has your brain created the pain felt in the body, possibly locked in from an emotional trauma many years earlier, even back to when you were a child? Chronic pain is created in many parts of the brain (evident in scans). Mindmapping physiotherapy techniques help to unwire the pain felt in the body.

So we're assessing the physical aspect. And that tells us so much about where we believe the problem is, or which systems are mostly causing the problem. Is it mostly the muscles? Is it mostly the nerves innovating the muscles? Is a blood flow problem? Is it something to do with what you are eating or if you don't move enough you are too weak. Or are you so stressed up, that you’re just pumping out inflammation into the area and you’re getting a more aggressive form of arthritis. And you don't need to. By looking at and at the same time feeling the response of your body, we learn a lot. If we hold a patient's hand that's sore, your eyes tend to move very differently than if you hold part of the body that isn't. Also there's a feeling about the hand, there's a hesitancy and there's a sort of a difference in the tone or strength.

There is so much in our senses, that we pick up on when we're assessing physically.  Clearly this can only be done physically, face to face. Most of the above would be totally impossible to achieve by virtual means.

In my next blog Your Physiotherapy Prescription I’ll take you through how we develop a Physiotherapy treatment prescription, or plan, which takes you through the steps needed to achieve a successful outcome and let you get on with your life.

 

In the meantime, if you are in pain right now and you feel confident we can help, then why not call now. Erica, Jean and Charlotte will be happy to help.

Call 01889 881488 Now

p.s. Don’t try to book online at this time as that is only suitable for existing clients already being treated for an existing problem.

Ok, you are in pain, you have tried the obvious remedies, like pain killers and anti-inflammatories or a bit of exercise, but they didn’t fix the problem. You don’t want to be on drugs for too long, so you are thinking about getting to see a physiotherapist to assess you properly and find out what the problem really is and how best to fix it.

This presents you with a number of problems, such as where is the best physiotherapy clinic to go to and is it experienced with helping your type of problem. If you have friends or family who can provide help, based on their own experiences, then great. If not, the next best thing is to look at Google reviews and /or ask on social media. If you want some help on how to choose a clinic and what you need to ask, then click on this link How to Choose A Physiotherapy Clinic

You may have assumed that a physical assessment will be the first step.

That is the mistake that so many make, missing out the vital steps of creating the right environment to build connection and trust, and gaining a deeper understanding of your important beliefs. Make that mistake and you are destined to gain so much less.

Many of the assessment skills we use at my clinic are not common in the UK or anywhere else in the world. I am fortunate to have studied and qualified at the highest level in specific pain relief techniques and as a result, I have learnt and ingrained advanced assessment techniques in myself and the rest of my team.

Thus today, I want to approach this from a different angle, one you might not have thought of as being important, but trust me, it’s vital to a successful outcome. It’s the environment of the assessment room, and that means not only your room but the physiotherapists as well when the assessment is being done virtually.

You see, we all have an inherent ability to recognise if there is a true focus on the problem and that you are being listened to. If the environment is full of distractions or interruptions, then your physiotherapist’s thoughts will be disrupted and you will sense it. Your physiotherapist needs to be in the present moment, focussed and not allowing other thoughts to clutter up their head.

That’s my number one piece of advice.

Clearly, the environment is much better when you are face to face with the physiotherapist who is assessing you. There’s much less probability of distraction and that vital bond of trust is so much easier to build.

If your physiotherapist practices mindfulness techniques, they will induce a mental state capable of focussed attention on you. Your healing will commence as soon as you sense the caring intention.

I’m going to continue this explanation of how to achieve a successful assessment in more blogs. If you want me to keep with me on this journey, look out for my next instalment ‘The Subjective Physiotherapy Assessment’, which continues to look at this topic from a new perspective.

 

In the meantime, if you are in pain right now and you feel confident we can help, then why not call now. Erica, Jean and Charlotte will be happy to help.

Call 01889 881488 Now

p.s. Don’t try to book online at this time as that is only suitable for existing clients already being treated for an existing problem.

In my two previous blogs A Different Perspective On Your Physiotherapy Assessment and The Subjective Physiotherapy Assessment, I discussed the importance of getting that connection and really listening to get the patients story.  Why are you here, what are your beliefs about treatment?

Now it’s time to go further, honing it down with specific questions about the problem.

Let’s use an example to help illustrate. Someone comes to me and they've had chronic pain in their foot for a very long time. I would be asking questions about the possibility of arthritis. Questions regarding the nervous system. Looking at the way that the body moves. Seeing if the pain is transmitting down from the spinal cord, because it could be a problem in the spine itself and not the foot at all. Having a look at the function of the foot, seeing if biomechanically the patient is walking in a strange way, and is that is making it worse?
How does it feel? How does the tissue feel? Is there any swelling? Are there problems with circulation? Is the sensation there? Are the nerves working properly? Is there an amplification of pain so that when I touch, the tissue is overly sensitive? What are the clues as to what's going on?

This is a very important start to this part of the assessment, which leads to the physical assessment.

To recap, the first part is establishing the connection and the story, the background, the beliefs, the values. The next part is to do with the Four Keys, to do with your immune system and your general health.

The next part is to hone it down into the particular problem today and how it's starting to manifest itself physically.

The final step is to go into the physical, which we can't do remotely by zoom. The physiotherapist has to get hands-on and assess physically, face to face.

In my next blog The Physical Assessment I will delve into the actual hands-on physical assessment. Many of you may have thought that this would be the first step in an assessment and that is the mistake that so many make, missing out on the vital steps of building connection and trust and gaining a deeper understanding of the all-important beliefs of the client. Make that mistake and you are destined to gain so much less.

In the meantime, if you are in pain right now and you feel confident we can help, then why not call now. Erica, Jean and Charlotte will be happy to help

Call 01889 881488 Now

p.s. Don’t try to book online at this time as that is only suitable for existing clients already being treated for an existing problem.

I get asked a lot of questions about physiotherapy assessment. What do we do at my clinic? How do I assess? How do I teach assessing?

In my previous blog A Different Perspective On Your Physiotherapy Assessment, I mentioned that the first and most important thing is to have a safe, quiet environment that builds a connection and trust. If you don't feel that with your physiotherapist, you're not going to want to proceed to any kind of medicine or treatment and your outcome won't be as successful. There won't be that connection.

To recap, the most important thing for the patient is that the physiotherapist has created a sacred space, a quiet office, where the phones are switched off, the computer is not a distraction, and you eyeball each other to get that connection. And then your physiotherapist listens to your story. And how you describe what's going on with you. And then, in that moment of connection, your physiotherapist can get glimpses of the real authentic self behind the story, who you really are.

Once your physiotherapist glimpses the story of the problem, he or she can start to elicit some background which is past medical history. So we'll ask questions like the health of your family to see if there are relevant genetic links. We may also explore your beliefs and values and more about your family so we'll know how difficult it is for you to attend and for you to have the necessary treatment. We may touch on your past experiences of treatment because if you've been scared or let down previously, you're going to have very different expectations. We need to address that head-on.

And then, of course, my favourite four keys questions (see my first book ‘The Four Keys To Health’ available on Amazon), which looks into your mindset, lifestyle, fitness and what you eat. All these help us assess how well your immune system is working, and your general health, which helps refine our treatment prescription.

That, in a nutshell, is the first part of the physiotherapy assessment.

In my next blog ‘The Subjective Physiotherapy Assessment – Part 2’ I will continue on this journey of helping you understand how to really get the most out of this process.

In the meantime, if you are in pain right now and you feel confident we can help, then why not call now. Erica, Jean and Charlotte will be happy to help.

Call 01889 881488 Now

p.s. Don’t try to book online at this time as that is only suitable for existing clients already being treated for an existing problem.

How can I relieve neck pain? The first thing to understand is how this happened, neck pain can be caused by other conditions such as muscle weakness in the shoulders, perhaps lifestyles such as workplace seating or even sports. Take a moment to consider what could be causing yours. While doing this, think about the type of pain you have. Is it a strain or a trapped nerve?

What does a trapped nerve in neck feel like?

neck pain

A trapped never typically feels more painful in certain positions, and the pain again can be shooting, described as electric or pulsing. A trapped nerve can throb and jolt when you are moving. A strain usually feels more like a burn or a tear; these sensations can be confusing, so please do not worry if you struggle to distinguish between the two - Our team can help you understand this better and decide the best ways to help you.

How long does neck strain take to heal?

A strain can take between 24-hours and a week to recover. If you are concerned Nicky Snazell can help you with pain relief, it is still worth considering what caused this. The underlying source is always the best way to provide you with long-term pain relief, and maintenance can reduce reoccurrence. 

What is the fastest way to fix a stiff neck?

If you are not ready to consider treatment, we recommend gentle stretches and a gentle massage in-between cooling and warming treatments like an ice-pack and a hot water bottle/wheat/rice bag. Be careful when doing this yourself. If you are unsure how to manage this effectively, contact us.  

Which massage is best for neck pain?

This depends on how you got the neck pain; if it was doing sports, then as you might expect, sports massage could be the proper treatment. Typically, massage is the right treatment for neck pain; manipulating the soft tissue can relax the problem and promote blood flow and healing. 

Where can you go for help with neck pain?

Nicky Snazell pain relief clinic in Stafford can help with neck pain. Please view this page for more information on neck pain, or contact us. Our experienced team of physiotherapists will help you navigate your pain and provide the most effective advice to help you long term. 

 

Like a traditional massage, sports massage more intensely manipulates the soft tissues and tendons. In addition, the masseuse uses more strength to purge the muscles, which helps to loosen and condition the essential structural integrity. As a result, you are less likely to become injured during sports or physical activity.  

Sports massage also helps to promote blood flow, which can aid healing and recovery after intensive exercise, which is why you will often find sports massage administered before and after races at running clubs.  

What are the common areas for sports massage? 

  • Typical sports massages include legs used by runners, athletes, hockey, cricket, and rugby players.
  • As well as the common sports previously mentioned, Netball and Tennis are also popular with shoulder and lower back sports massage therapies. 
  • The lower back is also a widespread complaint from horse riders, and we have seen jockeys from all over the world. 

What is a sports massage therapist?

A sports massage therapist administers the massage, 'a masseuse', and is often referred to as a therapist as this serves a purpose and not just for pleasure. Sports massage has more medical benefits than other massages which are for relaxation and wellbeing.

What is a sports massage like?

A sports massage is slightly more aggressive than a typical massage, so it can be somewhat uncomfortable initially; however, your therapist will discuss this with you throughout so that it is tolerable. The fact it is more aggressive should not put you off because the effectiveness of the sports massage is driven by the pressure placed on the soft tissues.  

There are many reasons that sports massage is so good for you and keeps you injury-free. This article covers some of the reasons sports massage is good for you. 

What is sports massage good for?

  • It is good for legs, shoulders, lower back, knees, calves, and neck. 
  • It is good for keeping your joints stable and loose, reducing the risk of sports injuries.
  • It is ideal for those who are physically active, runners and hikers. 
  • It is good for people who have previous injuries to stave off issues resurfacing. 

How can Nicky Snazell Pain Relief Clinic help?

Pain relief clinic is here to help; you will see one of our very experienced team. From there, we will discuss your specific needs and then complete your wellness programme. Nicky and the Pain Relief Clinic look forward to welcoming you aboard. If you are a first-time client, then please use the contact form; if you are an existing patient, you can use the online booking form. 

Rotator Cuff Physiotherapy

Many have heard of the rotator cuff in the shoulder and, not surprisingly, believe it to be a single part of the shoulder. The rotator cuff is, in fact, a group of four muscles that work together to provide dynamic stability of the shoulder joint, helping to control the joint during rotation:

  • Supraspinatus
  • Infraspinatus
  • Subscapularis
  • Teres Minor

The Supraspinatus is a small muscle which you can feel above the bony ridge on the back of your shoulder blade (scapula). It attaches to the top of the arm bone (humerus), just below the shoulder joint. The task of this muscle is to move the arm sideways away from the body for the first 15 degrees. After that other muscles take over most of the load, it is an area of the should that can be torn and is popular for 'Rotator Cuff Physiotherapy'

The Infraspinatus is a thick triangular muscle, which occupies the main part of the sculptured dent in the back of the shoulder blade, below the bony ridge. As one of the four muscles of the rotator cuff, the main function of the infraspinatus is to turn the arm out as in the backhand in tennis and stabilise the shoulder joint.

The Subscapularis is a large triangular muscle at the front of the shoulder blade, between the shoulder blade and the rib cage. It attaches to the top of the arm bone (humerus) and into the front of the shoulder capsule. Its role is to turn the arm in.

The Teres Minor muscle sits below the Infraspinatus. It is quite a small rounded muscle and its primary task is to stop the arm moving up when it is moved out sideways (abducted). It also helps the Infraspinatus turn the arm out.

TREATMENTS FOR ROTATOR CUFF TENDINITIS

Rotator cuff tendinitis describes the inflammatory response of one or more of the four rotator cuff tendons, due to impingement or overuse, and leading to more and more micro-trauma that can then lead to a tendon rupture and will require Rotator Cuff Physiotherapy.

The inflamed thickening of the tendons often causes the rotator cuff tendons to become trapped under the acromion (the bony projection of the shoulder blade over the shoulder joint) – like a carpet stuck under a door – causing sub-acromial impingement. Failure to heal then leads to further damage. Early treatment of tendinitis, therefore, is necessary in order to prevent the development of more chronic and serious conditions.
Treatment can include: first and foremost scapula re-education exercises, postural exercises to lessen the impingement, gentle shoulder mobilisations and massage, aided by local electrotherapies, such as laser, pulsed shortwave, shockwave and deep oscillation. Specific rehab exercises can help guide you back to full fitness.

happy holidays

2021 was so much better than 2020 and it will soon be over. For most of us it was a year in which much of the stress of 2020 had ebbed away and we could all be more confident to get out and enjoy life more.

With Christmas rapidly approaching, the holidays are going to give us a chance to relax, unwind and think of a brighter future. When we go out now, we already see more smiling faces and more people happy to say hello again and it’s only going to get better.

Holiday Mega Sale

Over 70% off

Sterling Silver Necklaces

Every women loves jewellery and we have just made it easier for you to buy a beautiful sterling silver necklace for yourself or that special lady in your life.

Large £10 or small £5

We have limited stock so don’t miss out, get yours now

 

This Christmas holiday take the time to think of a brighter, sunnier future and as the saying ‘every cloud has a silver lining’ goes, reflect upon what we need to learn and change as we approach the exit of the pandemic tunnel.

And even massive changes can happen fast. Do you remember last year seeing the rapid and significant improvements in the air and rivers that took just a few weeks to occur? What a wonderful thing to see.  A lesson learnt. You can achieve almost anything if you put your mind to it. So think big, don’t limit your imagination. And make sure you are as healthy and able as you can be. Don’t let your own body hold you back!

If you are in pain, we can help.

Christmas Opening Hours

This year we will be closing on Christmas eve and then reopening on Tuesday 4th January.  Make sure you don’t leave it too late to book any treatment needed before Christmas. It’s only 4 weeks away!

 

Get the treatment you need.

Call Now 01889 881488

Erica, Jean and Charlotte will be happy to help

 

Physiotherapy Treatment For Vertigo Caused By BPPV

Vertigo is a problem that affects around half the population at some point in their lives and is more common as we get older. Fortunately, the symptoms usually only last for a few seconds to a minute or so, but the symptoms are very unpleasant including:
• Nausea and vomiting
• Dizziness
• Fainting
• A sense of rotating
• Inability to stand or walk

What Causes Vertigo

It is widely accepted as the most common cause of vertigo is BPPV (Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo) and this is linked to the 3 semi-circular canals in the inner ear. The role of these canals is to sense the position of the head in the 3 axes of up /down, right / left, forward/ backwards. If any incorrect signals occur, the brain doesn’t know where your head is and gets confused.

Faulty signals are caused by very small chalk crystals becoming loose and getting into the semi-circular canals. These loose crystals then move in the canals, stimulating faulty signals.

The types of movement which most frequently initiate a vertigo attack are rolling over in bed, getting out of bed, sitting up after lying flat or looking up or down.

Vertigo Treatment

Left untreated, vertigo will usually resolve itself but may take several months. Fortunately, treatment is fairly simple and painless and typically no more than 3 specialised Physiotherapy treatments are needed over a couple of weeks.

David Paling, a senior physiotherapist and our clinical lead can diagnose and treat BPPV.

If you or someone you know is suffering from vertigo, then physiotherapy treatment with us should seriously be considered.

Call the clinic now on 01889 881488 and ask for an assessment with David.